4 Signs Your Kids Need to Learn the Value of Money

4 Signs Your Kids Need to Learn the Value of Money

The day you realize your child or children have no concept of the value of money can be both jarring and eye opening. We all want to raise confident, empowered, educated, well prepared kids. But often times, our desire to give our kids the absolute best can lead to entitlement issues. 

In reality, the best gift we can give our kids is an education in life. One of the most important life skills for any kid to learn is the value of money. It’s not always an easy concept, especially for young kids or kids who’ve already established a pattern of being given everything they ask for. But, it’s also never too late to start and reverse old patterns that didn’t serve your family well. 

You might be wondering if it’s time to start talking to your kids about the value of money. If you’re wondering about it, I’m guessing you’re already beginning to see the signs below and that’s why it’s begun to weigh on you.

Here are 4 signs your kids need to learn the value of money

They say “I need” when it’s really a want. Pinterest image - 4 signs your kids need to learn the value of money

Teaching our kids the difference between a want and a need can be so difficult. While it is tricky to explain to littles and sometimes confusing for them to work out in their minds, it is so important. If they think they “need” things that are very clearly wants, this is a major red flag. 

They tell you to just put it on your credit card. 

The first time I told my child we weren’t getting something because I didn’t have cash on me and he responded with, “That’s okay mom, just put it on your credit card”, I actually froze in my spot. 

Kids see, hear, and absorb more than you might expect. Which means, they’re likely seeing and hearing ads for credit cards all over the place. 

If you don’t show them your cards or talk to them about credit, from what they see on TV, they may think credit cards are a magical flow of endless money in every adult’s pocket. If they can verbalize this – it’s time to talk to them about how credit really works.

They expect to get something whenever you’re out shopping.

I feel like this was one of my biggest mom fails for a long time. Every time we were out shopping ANYWHERE I would allow my kids to pick something. To me, it was worth the money to have them cooperate on the shopping trip. 

Boy was I wrong about what this habit was actually teaching my kids. The headaches it gave me down the road were far worse than simply having said “No” on the spot. Which leads us nicely to…

They throw a tantrum when you say “No” to a purchase in a store. 

Child throwing a tantrum in the store because she doesn't know the value of moneyEvery parent HATES being the one who’s kid is melting down in the store. So, many of us do whatever we can to avoid it. Like, letting them have whatever they want just to simply avoid the public embarrassment and shame that will come along with their tantrum. 

In reality, if they react this way to your saying no, it’s a definite sign that they need to learn about what can and can’t be bought and why. They need to learn how money works and when and where it should be spent. 

It’s never too early to start talking about money

Bottom line, it’s never too early to start talking to your kids about money and showing them the real value of money. The more kids see and are involved in your conversations about finances and budgeting, the better prepared they’ll be to handle their own finances as young adults. 

If you grew up with no concept of the value of money, you don’t have to repeat the pattern with your own children. 

Now that you know your child NEEDS to learn about money, what do you do?

First, you’ll need to know if they are cognitively ready to learn about money. Can they count? This is important. For more information on determining if they are cognitively ready to talk about money, check out this post

If you decide that they can handle the topic, next you need a plan. This is where we can help you! We’ve devised an action plan for establishing a chore system and budget WITH our kids. To completely understand the value of money, it’s so important that your kids be involved in the family budgeting process.

How we Connect with Our Kids: Ideas for Parent Child One-on-One Time

How we Connect with Our Kids: Ideas for Parent Child One-on-One Time

This post contains affiliate links. Though there is a chance that I will receive a small commission from purchases made through these links, I assure you I do not recommend or endorse any product or service that I have not tried myself and do not whole-heartily support. 

I can so clearly recall the feelings I used to have about our household. It felt like I was grasping at straws trying to hold it all together. I felt pulled in a million directions but none were really where I felt I should be. I struggled to manage our family and all of the unique personalities that made it. 

Since that time, one system that’s become incredibly important in our home is spending one-on-one time with each of our children. Having special time with my children where we embrace an activity of their choosing really puts a smile on my face. I love connecting with each member of my family individually and really getting to know who they are and what they love. The best part of all, is that I can see and feel the joy in their heart when they have my complete and undivided attention. 

With some help and the implementation of what we call “Special Time” our family and household is now functioning more like a team and less like a circus. 

Mother and daughter spending one-on-one time outside

Why we do this

A few years back, it was becoming clear to us that our house was not always the calm atmosphere we’d envisioned creating for our kids. I was at my wits end trying to manage all of the family dynamics in our household. I just didn’t know how to approach certain behavioral issues with my kids.

We needed to acknowledge our own shortcomings in our family dynamic. We didn’t have bad kids – we had kids who were craving our undivided attention. Giving our kids our undivided attention is no longer difficult because we have a plan on hand and it has become part of our family systems and routines.

We also know that as our kids get older, the need for connection will become even more crucial. If we have established a close and connected one-on-one relationship with each of our children, as they go through middle school and teen struggles – they will feel safe and secure leaning on us because they are already used to having our undivided attention on a regular basis. 

How we got started

mother spending one-on-one time with her sonWe got started with adding one-on-one time with each of our kids to our daily schedules when we first began exploring Positive Parenting Solutions. One of the modules they provided that immediately caught our eye was the Mind Body and Soul Time. This is their video training module that goes over the specific steps you need to follow to get started with implementing parent/child one-on-one time with each of your kids. You know I love having an organized plan, so this was right up my alley!

With our kids, we call this “Special Time”. When we first started, we usually try to do it 10-15 minutes every night before bedtime. Each of our kids would start with one parent and at the end of that time, we switched. My hubby is a firefighter and gone for 2-3 days at a time. We keep him involved in this through the use of FaceTime. The ultimate recommendation is 1-2 times a day for 10-15 minutes everyday. For our family, 10-15 minutes before bedtime was what worked best. We shoot for having special time with each of our kiddos each night, but as they get older and involved in more sports and activities, we’ve had to become more flexible with this. Now, shoot for a half hour or an hour if we’ve needed to skip a few days. 

Some of our Favorite Activities

Activities will definitely vary based on your kids’ interests and ages. The activities will also likely change over time as they grow, mature, and their interests change. Another factor in choosing activities might be weather. Some of our favorite activities won’t be possible in rain or winter – but might be the top pic all summer long. 

I love to let my kids help with the process of choosing when we spend our time together and how we spend our time together. We usually play different board games. Some of our favorite are Uno, Monopoly, Guesstures, or Charades. We love board games! We also love playing cards, drawing, playing with toys, or imaginative play. Sometimes, we’ll even play a game on their iPad together.

Here are some additional one-on-one activity ideas your kids might enjoy:Pin for parent child One-on-one time

  • Building LEGOS
  • Baking
  • Hiking
  • Playing basketball, soccer, or baseball
  • Reading together
  • Coloring, drawing, or painting
  • Writing stories together
  • Dancing 

How you can Implement more one-on-one time in your home

Getting started with establishing a plan for one-on-one parent/child time can be super easy and fun! Pick a time and get it on your calendar, get your child involved with choosing how they’d like to spend their time, eliminate distractions for you and your child (put your phone down!), and get started!

Our “Special Time” has created such positive change in our home. It’s our job as parents to set our kids up for every possible success. Our goal as parents is to raise kids that are well prepared for adulthood. There are so many ways we can prepare them for what is to come in their future but one simple way is by creating a home atmosphere where they feel seen, understood and connected. 

We do this by spending one-on-one time with each of our children. By doing this, we know we are teaching them valuable lessons they can bring with them into their adult lives. 

If you’re ready to jump in but you’d like more info on how to implement this into your own family, I recommend checking out Positive Parenting Solutions. Take some time to check out their module on Mind Body and Soul Time. You won’t regret it. 

The Top 4 Values Kids Learn from a Family Chore System

The Top 4 Values Kids Learn from a Family Chore System

doing laundry with mom, part of a family chore systemDeciding whether or not to implement a chore system in your home can be tricky. There are many factors that may weigh on your decision as to if it is the right time for your family to get started with a chore system. Some things to consider are your kids ages, physical abilities, cognitive abilities, and ability to adjust to new routines.  

In our home, for our kids, we are in favor of establishing chore systems early. This is because of the multitude of positive values having a chore system has taught our children. Four particular values stand out to us as the most important. 

Here are the top 4 values your kids will learn when you begin to implement a chore system in your home:

Responsibilitykids doing chores according to their family chore system

Teaching kids about responsibility can be a little tricky because it’s multifaceted. There are multiple ways to approach responsibility – being responsible, acting responsibly, having responsibilities, and taking responsibility. The common thread is that they all relate to doing what is expected of us. 

Responsibility is an important trait to instill in our children because it opens their eyes to expectations. When children take on new responsibilities, it establishes rules, habits, and routines that form the basis for all future interactions. Assigning your child chores gives them something they can be responsible for and take ownership of. 

Establishing the value of responsibility leads to trust and freedom within your parent-child relationship. It also leads right into accountability, as this is what your child will need to acknowledge if they are not responsible, acting responsibly, or taking care of their responsibilities. 

Accountability

Once your kids understand responsibility, it becomes easier for them to grasp the concept of accountability, too. When your child takes responsibility for their actions, their items, or their mistakes – the idea of accountability grows clear. Accountability does not need to have a negative connotation. Accountability is owning up to something you’ve done wrong or failed to do and accepting the consequences. 

For kids, accountability is all about taking ownership of and following through with their responsibilities. The follow through is the sweet spot where your kids will see the results of their hard work and begin to feel pride in what they are doing. 

Our goal in establishing chore systems is to help our kids understand that being accountable for their actions and responsibilities means they are holding themselves to a high standard 

Habits and Routines

doing dishes as part of a family chore systemDeveloping habits and routines are an integral part of running any happy household. Kids thrive on routines. When kids develop positive habits and routines, they know what to expect, feel secure and supported, and release anxiety. 

There’s also positive benefits for the parents. For you, it will look like less nagging and reminding, you’ll be less stressed, and you’ll have more time together as a family.

Habits and routines in a home teach kids how to self-manage, work together as a family, and create a home environment that is full of positivity. Chore systems easily become a part of your family routine and habits. Kids know and expect they will be handling their assigned tasks and they welcome the comfort of this consistency. 

Independence

Our ultimate goal as parents is to set our kids up to be successful adults. Of course, we want to keep them safe – but we also want them to grow into independent, healthy, and happy adults. As a parent, there is a delicate balance between guiding our kids and letting them care for themselves, when the time comes. 

When you establish chore systems in your home, you will watch your children become more independent right in front of your eyes. As they take responsibility for their chores, accept accountability, and develop their routines – they will begin to need your support and guidance around these particular chores less and less. 

When children develop independence, they become equipped with necessary life skills, self sufficient, empowered, and confident. As parents, isn’t that what we all want for our children?

 

Are you ready to implement a family chore system in your home but you just don’t know how to get started or get yourself organized? We’ve got you covered! Grab our totally FREE Family Chore and Money System Action Guide and we will walk you through the step-by-step process of designing, implementing, and sticking to a plan that works for your family.

Creative Ways to Cut Expenses and Increase Your Monthly Income

Creative Ways to Cut Expenses and Increase Your Monthly Income

The new year is the perfect time for goal setting and dreaming big. For us, one thing that goes hand-in-hand with those two things is updating our monthly budget. My husband and I decided a while ago that talking openly and honestly about our finances is a must for our family. Sometimes this involves talking about how we can cut expenses or find creative ways to bring in more income. 

I think it’s safe to say, we’d all love to have a little extra spending money in our pockets. And for some of us, we need more money each month just to make ends meet. No matter which category you fall into, there are some truly genius tips and tricks out there to cut back on your monthly expenses and increase your income.

Here are our top creative ways to cut expenses and increase your monthly income:

Ideas to cut expenses

Bundle or eliminate monthly bills:

  • Cancel cable and opt for a few, cheaper streaming services. Hulu offers a lot of network programs the day after they air on cable. Disney+ will keep the kids happy for less than $6 a month. This combined with Hulu comes out to $12 a month as opposed to the average American cable bill which is $107 per month. 
  • Bundle your cable, internet, and phone bill. If you’re not ready to cancel your cable, consider combining it with your phone and internet into a single “Triple Play”. This type of offering can drop your combined costs to as low as $79.99. Another pro tip – if you purchase your own router and wireless modem you will eliminate some of the additional monthly fees you see on your cable bill.
  • Cancel your gym membership. If you aren’t using it, let it go. If you do use it, but only occasionally, think of creative ways to get in a workout without shelling out a monthly fee – like jogging, hiking, or cycling. 
  • Bundle your home and car insurance. Many insurance companies offer significant discounts for bundling your car and homeowners insurance. Shop around for the best offer you can find with maximum coverage for your protection. 

Groceries 

  • I know you’ve heard of couponing, but have you actually tried it? On average, shoppers using coupons can save $30-$50 a week. Additionally, make sure that you are signed up for the rewards and discount cards at whatever store you grocery shop at. 
  • Buy in bulk – Costco, BJs, Sam’s Club – they all offer bulk groceries at great prices. If your shopping for a small family, ask a friend to split the cost and the products.  
  • Shop at discount stores like Aldi. Just because you are looking to cut your expenses, doesn’t mean the quality of your groceries has to suffer. Aldi offers organic and local produce at an incredibly discounted rate. They sell the Simply Nature brand which is both high quality and organic. 
  • Buy store brand groceries. Often times, the quality and taste are virtually the same as their name brand counterparts. 

Spend Less on Food and Drinks

  • Don’t stop for coffee. Make it at home. Depending on if you get your morning brew at the gas station, Dunkin, or Starbucks, you could be saving yourself anywhere from $1 to $5 a day.  
  • Pack your lunch. This option will always be cheaper than eating out or ordering in. Just consider how different the cost would be to prepare and pack a salad from home vs. buying a pricey salad from a local lunch spot. 
  • Limit dinners out. Review your budget and decide exactly how much you can spend each month on eating out or ordering in. You’ll find this helpful in budgeting for your dining out expenses. 

Ditch your car (when you can)

Whenever you are able to opt to cycle, carpool, or walk instead of driving your car. The benefits here are huge. First, you’ll save on gas. You lower your likelihood of being involved in a costly automobile accident. You’ll lower the amount of pricey maintenance and wear and tear on your vehicle. And, remember that gym membership you cancelled? Well, use this as an opportunity to keep fit.

Ideas to bring in extra money

Teach Classes Online

With the growth of the internet, there are so many opportunities to teach online. If you happen to have a teaching license (from any US state) you can teach content at an online school like K12 or ESL at VIPKid

Check out Teachable or Udemy for vocational courses. I’ve recently seen course offerings on needle point, cake decorating, and scrap booking. With limited technological know-how, you can offer your own course based on your hobby in no time.

Freelance 

If you have a marketable skill, like, writing, graphic design, or web development, you can offer it as a freelancer. If you work full-time or part-time, consider picking up some clients on nights and weekends. If you’re a stay-at-home mom, you can always try doing some work early mornings, during nap time, or after the kiddos are in bed. Check out sites like Fiverr, UpWork, and The Mom Project

Sell Gently Used Items Online

There is a huge market for selling gently used items. My first stop is always Facebook Marketplace, but there are tons of apps for it, too. Check out Mercari and LetGo – they both come highly recommended. And, don’t rule out old standbys like Craigslist and Ebay

Sell a physical product

For us, it’s our PreparaKit first aid kits. As a nurse, encouraging safety in families is something that is tremendously important to me. 

However, you don’t need to start out with something this involved. With sites like Etsy, you can sell almost anything you make – jewelry, apparel, home decor, the possibilities are endless. 

Whether you need to cut expenses and bring in more income or you’d just like a little extra money each month for a safety net, I encourage you to check out our Free Family Monthly Action Plan. This Monthly Budgeting Action Plan offers step-by-step instructions to guide you through the exact steps you need to take to set up your own family budgeting plan. 

The 5 Phases of Overspending

The 5 Phases of Overspending

If you’re reading this, I’m guessing you fall into one of two categories. Either you’re on top of your finances but you’re a little curious to learn more about the five phases of overspending or you know you have some spending issues and you want to figure out where you fall within these five phases. 

If you want to get ahead of your finances, you absolutely need to be aware of these 5 phases of overspending. It’s crucial that understand the impact that moving through these phases will have on you and your family if you aren’t on top of it.

The 5 phases of overspending

I modeled my 5 phases of overspending to the 5 stages of grieving.

They are:

  1. Denial
  2. Frustration
  3. Bargaining
  4. Depression
  5. Acceptance

Let’s break it down and jump into each of these phases one-by-one.

Denial

Denial - the first phase of the 5 phases of overspendingThose who are in denial think, “If there’s money in the bank, spend it.” The denial phase is full of over spenders. If you are an over spender, it’s time to take a hard look at yourself in the mirror. You may be in denial.

People in this phase don’t have a care in the world about what they spend. They spend like crazy with no limits or worry. The denial phase is characterized by a buy now and deal with it later mentality. 

If you’re in this phase – you need to wake up! This is the worst place you could be. 

Frustration

Eventually, you get to the point where living paycheck-to-paycheck no longer works. There are bills to pay but you don’t have the money to pay them. You’re 2 days away from payday but you have a bill due now. So, you need to go to a check advancing place or you need to borrow money from friends and family. 

This is frustrating. It’s frustrating because you don’t have the money in your bank account but you know it’s coming.

You may cycle through the denial and frustration phases for a while because once you get the money and pay the bill, you will move right back into the denial phase. Something needs to give.

Bargaining

Here, you know you have cycled through denial and frustration for a while. Then payday comes around. Now you’re bargaining with yourself. You know you should pay back the money you owe or pay down your credit card debt, but you convince yourself that you need to spend the money on something. You convince yourself that you’ll pay everyone back with your next paycheck. You have the money and you really want to treat yourself so you do. You tell yourself it’s okay to spend the money because you have it. You can always pay off your debts later. 

Depression

Depression - the final phases of the 5 phases of overspendingAfter all of the denial, frustration, and bargaining, you’ve spent too many nights lying awake reflecting on your life and why your accounts are empty at the end of the month. The constant cycle has put a strain on your relationships because you are always fighting over money. You’re going to work to earn money but you aren’t happy. It isn’t paying enough.

This endless cycle continues every month and you ultimately start feeling the stress. You start feeling sad, helpless, and depressed about your financial situation and it starts to bleed into other areas of your life. This is not where you ever pictured you’d be and you hate the way it feels. 

Acceptance

Finally, you get to the acceptance phase. You accept the fact that you have money issues, that you need help and that you are ready to do something about it. You’re sick and tired of being frustrated and depressed about your money situation. You finally get to a point where you’re fed up with living paycheck-to-paycheck, having no money and/or being in debt. You’re now ready to make some drastic changes to get yourself out of the mess you’ve made. 

This is when you really begin to turn your life around. Stop living paycheck-to-paycheck. Pay off debt. End the constant rat race. 

For our family, it took hitting this stage to finally decide to take action to eliminate our debt through research and seeking help.

Be real with yourself and accept where you are at right now so that you can do something about it. If you’ve reached the acceptance stage and you’re ready to take action, check out our Free Family Monthly Action Plan. This Monthly Budgeting Action Plan, offers step-by-step instructions to guide you through the exact steps you need to take to set up your own family budgeting plan.